We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy

Population Growth in India

            Out of the 6 billion people in the world, 1 billion of these are from India. Despite the  presence of a population policy in the country, little has been achieved in terms of population control. This report shall look into the population trends of India and then present some insights on its impact on the country’s economy as a whole.

GET EVEN A BETTER ESSAY WE WILL WRITE A CUSTOM
ESSAY SAMPLE ON
Population Growth in India TOPICS SPECIFICALLY FOR YOU

Data of India’s Population

CENSUS POPULATION OF INDIA, 1901-91
Census
Year
Population
(in Lakhs)
Decimal
Growth
Rate
Geometric
Growth
Rate
1901
2384.0


1911
2520.9
5.75
0.56
1921
2513.2
-0.31
-0.03
1931
2789.8
11
1.06
1941
3186.6
14.22
1.34
1951
3610.9
13.31
1.26
1961
4392.3
21.51
1.98
1971
5481.6
24.8
2.24
1981
6833.3
24.7
2.22
1991
8463.0
23.85
2.14
** Exclusive of J&K
Source: Registrar General of India

 Projected Population of India (1996 – 2016)

Millions

Percentage
Distribution

Males
Females
Persons
Males
Females
1996
485
449
934
51.9
48.1
2001
524
488
1012
51.8
48.2
2006
564
530
1094
51.6
48.4
2011
607
572
1179
51.5
48.5
2016
649
615
1264
51.3
48.7
Source : Compiled from the report of the Technical Group on Population Projections (1996)

            The data of India’s population from 1901 to 1991 and projected population from 1996 to 2016 were taken from Indian NGOs website. The website derived their data from the Registrar General of India and the Technical Group on Population Projections. The population pyramid that was presented after the population data was taken from the U.S. Census Bureau website.

            The issue of population growth in India has been a topic of concern because the country is currently facing an intense crisis of resources. India’s huge population puts pressure on its limited resources. The country’s food security was being threatened by environmental degradation and the  continuing contraction of cropland per person. This problem caused dispute among communities and states.  In 1999, an article from the World Watch Institute indicated that in the years 1960 to 1999, the average hectares of grainland for each Indian has decreased from 0.21 hectares to 0.10 hectares. The amount decreased by less than half as much. It was projected that this amount will shrink to only 0.07 hectares per person in 2050 (Brown and Halweil). The presence of an unhealthy workforce leads to lesser productivity. This will eventually slow down long-term growth. A high population growth rate could also have an impact on infant and child health. This will also pose challenges in terms of educating the young population. Education is essential, especially for the females, because it is the key to smaller families.

            The first table indicates that population growth rate has increased for most of the periods from 1901 to 1991. The average population growth rate peaked in 1971 at 2.24%.  The population projections for the years 1996 to 2016 shows an average population growth rate of 1.58% from 1996 to 2006 and 1.45% from 2006 to 2016. These projections show some promise, but knowing the country’s existing population, these estimates are not good enough. The second table indicates that India’s population will increase from 934 million to 1.2 billion in 2016. Since the projected decrease in the level of population growth rate is not enough, an effective population control program with solid implementation is still necessary to address this alarming concern.

            India’s population pyramid for the years 2000 and 2025 are shown above. The huge base shows that a majority of the population are the the young ones. In the years to come, the number of women in child bearing ages and the working age population will become a greater part of the total population than today. According to a study on the population of India, the total fertility rate has decreased by 42% since 1965. Despite these numbers, the number of births will still be expected to be high because of the continued increase in the number of women in the reproductive age (Adlakha, 1997, p.1).

References

Adlakha, A. (1997). Population Trends: India, International Brief. Retrieved from U.S. Department         of Commerce, Economics, and Statistics Administration. Bureau of the Census.

Brown, L., and Halweil, B. (1999). India Reaching 1 Billion on August 15: No Celebration Planned.             Retrieved December 10, 2007 from World Watch Institute.

IndianNGOs. (N.D.). “Population: Statistics.” Retrieved December 10, 2007 from             http://www.indianngos.com/issue/population/statistics/index.html

U.S. Census Bureau. (2007, July 16). “Country Summary: India.” Retrieved December 10, 2007            from http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idb/country/inportal.html#DI

 

Share this Post!

Kylie Garcia

Hi there, would you like to get such a paper? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out